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Something little I think clients love

Taking pets to the back, at a veterinary clinic, can be stressful for owners; what are they going to do with my pet and how will they be treated, are common thoughts. When ever I need to take a pet back, I always bend down and talk to the pet, I tell them that we are going on an adventure and that i need them to be brave. I usually get a smile or even a laugh from the owner. It makes me feel good that i could give them something to laugh about, a little something to lighten the mood.

Filed under vet tech veterinary medicine client relationship

1,402 notes

reptiliaherps:

markscherz:

reptilesrevolution:

Tiger Keelback - Rhabdophis tigrinus

- East and SE Asia

they bioaccumulate toad toxins in nuchal glands for defensive purposes, all while making their own predatory venom in maxillary glands

Poison – a toxin that gains entry to the body via the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract of via absorption through intact body layers (e.g. ciguatoxin). Typically alkaloidal or other ring structures 

Venom – a toxin or mixture of toxins that can only gain access to the body through a wound (e.g. by a fish spine or snake fang). Typically proteins or peptides.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=428993943893710&set=a.136155593177548.24567.100003493256218&type=1&theater

POISONOUS SNAKES GUYS. I DID NOT KNOW THIS THING. HOLY WOW.

this is literally the coolest thing.

67 notes

iheartvmt:

lots-of-dogs:

Perro de Presa Canario

“There are numerous books written by Historians concerning the development of the known Perro de Presa Canario (the “Canary Dog of Prey”). Documentation of the original, holding dogs date back to the XV and XVI centuries. Following the conquest of the Canary Islands it is theorized dogs of great size may have existed or were brought there by the Spanish Conquistadors or possibly both. What is known was the function for which these dogs were developed; guarding farms, struggling with cattle and the extermination of wild or stray dogs.
There are several theories regarding the genetic contributions to the creation of the Presa Canario. It is almost certain that the cattle dog, the Iberian Presa (Perro de Ganado Majorero) provided a start to the founding of the Canary Presa. The Ganado was a mastiff type of average size, rustic, intelligent with an intuitive instinct, a fearless guardian. Several other Hispanic breeds contributed to the Presas formation, especially the Presa Espanol in its large varieties and the bulldog varieties (Alano), known for its clutching instincts. In time the island dogs developed into a completely differentiated breed due to the influence of the Spanish breeds. Around the XVIII century, the English colonists, traders and merchants brought their Bandogges and Tiedogs - predecessors of the Bulldogs and Mastiffs - to the Canary Islands. Shortly thereafter, the English introduced their gladiator breeds (Bulldogs and Bull/Terriers) and began crossbreeding with the then existent “Perro de Presa” of the Canary Archipelago. To what degree did each of these introduced breeds contribute genetically to the overall development of the Presa Canario remains unanswerable.
The final ingredient that completes the foundation of the Presa Canario was the genetic infusion of the Bardino Majorero, a pre-Hispanic sheepdog originating on the Island of Fuerteventura. This dog was introduced for its intelligence, physical resistance, offering of excellent guardian instincts with little bark, extraordinary set of teeth and incorruptible courage. The combination of known holding dogs, holding dogs of the continent and the Bardino Majorero, started a new grouping of holding dogs. New to the traditional functions of guarding and catching livestock was added a new function, the fight.
In the 1940’s the prohibition of dog fighting was ordered throughout the islands, although clandestine fights were known to continue during the next decade. It was during this period the Presa Canario numbers truly faltered. The sovereignty of the island Presa worsened further with the introduction of the German shepherd, the Doberman pinscher, and the Great Dane. The island dog fancier’s interest now focused on these new breeds, almost causing the demise of the Presa Canario breed. During this darkened period the Presa was relegated in small numbers to farmers and herdsmen as their primary guard dog.
Reconstruction of the nearly extinct Presa Canario began in earnest back in the early 1970’s. Reputable breeders bred strong Presas that were rustic, massive, vigorous, and functional, who had acute watchdog instincts, a strong temperament, calm yet confident and were extremely territorial with unlimited courage. This dog when defending what he considers his would withstand the harshest of punishments without surrendering his position.” (source: http://www.akc.org/breeds/perro_de_presa_canario/history.cfm)

iheartvmt:

lots-of-dogs:

Perro de Presa Canario

There are numerous books written by Historians concerning the development of the known Perro de Presa Canario (the “Canary Dog of Prey”). Documentation of the original, holding dogs date back to the XV and XVI centuries. Following the conquest of the Canary Islands it is theorized dogs of great size may have existed or were brought there by the Spanish Conquistadors or possibly both. What is known was the function for which these dogs were developed; guarding farms, struggling with cattle and the extermination of wild or stray dogs.

There are several theories regarding the genetic contributions to the creation of the Presa Canario. It is almost certain that the cattle dog, the Iberian Presa (Perro de Ganado Majorero) provided a start to the founding of the Canary Presa. The Ganado was a mastiff type of average size, rustic, intelligent with an intuitive instinct, a fearless guardian. Several other Hispanic breeds contributed to the Presas formation, especially the Presa Espanol in its large varieties and the bulldog varieties (Alano), known for its clutching instincts. In time the island dogs developed into a completely differentiated breed due to the influence of the Spanish breeds. Around the XVIII century, the English colonists, traders and merchants brought their Bandogges and Tiedogs - predecessors of the Bulldogs and Mastiffs - to the Canary Islands. Shortly thereafter, the English introduced their gladiator breeds (Bulldogs and Bull/Terriers) and began crossbreeding with the then existent “Perro de Presa” of the Canary Archipelago. To what degree did each of these introduced breeds contribute genetically to the overall development of the Presa Canario remains unanswerable.

The final ingredient that completes the foundation of the Presa Canario was the genetic infusion of the Bardino Majorero, a pre-Hispanic sheepdog originating on the Island of Fuerteventura. This dog was introduced for its intelligence, physical resistance, offering of excellent guardian instincts with little bark, extraordinary set of teeth and incorruptible courage. The combination of known holding dogs, holding dogs of the continent and the Bardino Majorero, started a new grouping of holding dogs. New to the traditional functions of guarding and catching livestock was added a new function, the fight.

In the 1940’s the prohibition of dog fighting was ordered throughout the islands, although clandestine fights were known to continue during the next decade. It was during this period the Presa Canario numbers truly faltered. The sovereignty of the island Presa worsened further with the introduction of the German shepherd, the Doberman pinscher, and the Great Dane. The island dog fancier’s interest now focused on these new breeds, almost causing the demise of the Presa Canario breed. During this darkened period the Presa was relegated in small numbers to farmers and herdsmen as their primary guard dog.

Reconstruction of the nearly extinct Presa Canario began in earnest back in the early 1970’s. Reputable breeders bred strong Presas that were rustic, massive, vigorous, and functional, who had acute watchdog instincts, a strong temperament, calm yet confident and were extremely territorial with unlimited courage. This dog when defending what he considers his would withstand the harshest of punishments without surrendering his position.” (source: http://www.akc.org/breeds/perro_de_presa_canario/history.cfm)

Filed under beautiful dog

2 notes

People are pieces of shit…

I saw my first abandonment case yesterday at the clinic. A parks officer brought in a dog that was found in the middle of a hiking trail. It was a husky/sheppard mix that was between 7-9 years old. She was emaciated and couldn’t walk….but the dog was clean. We’ve had some rain the past few days, so if the dog had been outside she would have been muddy or at least have some dirt on her paws..she had none. We believe that someone carried her into the park and left her. She had a cupcake collar but no microchip.

Apparently there was no other choice but to euthanize her. She was really sweet and it was really upsetting to have to put her to sleep. 

Filed under animal cruelity dogs how can someone do that